A warm-up drawing. Red col-erase prismacolor on crappy sketchbook paper.

A warm-up drawing. Red col-erase prismacolor on crappy sketchbook paper.

Tags: drawings

Tilda Swinton in Snowpiercer

Looking at Snowpiercer on my movie blog today.

The setting of the film is uniquely structured for set pieces. Each train car as our heroes move forward presents a new environment with a new set of rules of engagement. In this, Snowpiercer recalls its origins as a graphic novel. You can view each new set as a panel border if you like. This is an elaboration of the scrolling corridor fight in Oldboy stretched to encompass most of the film. Certainly, the ax fight that’s the film’s most brutal and energizing set-piece seems derived from Oldboy. In spite of the film’s structure, it doesn’t seem episodic. It’s all of a piece, with each part of the film forming a tile in a mosaic whose overall picture only becomes clear in the exegesis at the end. But even if it were as episodic as it sometimes seems, the individual pieces are all so touched with strangeness that it would still be worth watching. If the structure of the film seems looted from other films, then the excressences that decorate that structure are Bong’s alone, whether it’s Mason’s appearance and her odd hand gestures (also part of the exegesis at the end), the big fish into whose guts Wilford’s thugs dip their axes at the start of the ax fight, the ghastly punishment meted out to dissidents involving the freezing wind and a big sledgehammer, the seeming clairvoyance of Namgoong’s daughter (which provides the film with one of its best shocks), Allison Pill’s homicidal teacher and her creepy pedagogy. or the sushi bar mid-train where our heroes and the film take a short rest mid-film before plunging toward the climax. All of this marks the film distinctively. There’s a whiff of steampunk in some settings, while there’s a resplendent miserablism in others. None of these settings necessarily reads as “real,” but for the most part it doesn’t matter. This is a fable more than it’s a story in the conventional Hollywood sense of the word, so the set of reality is permitted some level of abstraction.

christiannescomics:

The Courtship of Doctor Doom for Tenebrous Kate’s Dream Dates with Fictional Villains ‘zine. Mostly brush and ink on bristol board. The working title for this was: “Bah! Doom Does Not Engage in Foreplay.”

Reblogging myself again.

christiannescomics:

The Courtship of Doctor Doom for Tenebrous Kate’s Dream Dates with Fictional Villains ‘zine. Mostly brush and ink on bristol board. The working title for this was: “Bah! Doom Does Not Engage in Foreplay.”

Reblogging myself again.

"Part of being an adult is going, ‘Yes there are people prettier/smarter/more talented than me, but I’m good on my own’. You’re not oppressed by something just because it makes you feel insecure."

Molly Crabapple (via wordsaresinging)

Oh, boy, I wish I could shove this into some brains until it sticks.

(via colleendoran)

I need to shove this into my own brain until it sticks.

(via colleendoran)

beautyandterrordance:

"Sometimes I have wondered whether life wouldn’t be much more amusing if we were all devils, no nonsense about angels and being good”, via universalmonstersblog.

(Source: fred---astaire)

Not necessarily a call for submissions

I was having a conversation with another comics-drawing trans lady friend of mine a few days ago and we kinda sorta brainstormed an anthology of comics by and about trans women. There would have to be some kind of crowd-funding, of course, and I would want to see everyone get a good page rate (trans women being chronically poor). Would there be any interest in this? And who would be good candidates for inclusion?

(via Christianne’s Art and Comics: Nat and Alex)

Here’s a watercolor I did this weekend to get back into practice. Damn, I’m rusty.

(via Christianne’s Art and Comics: Nat and Alex)

Here’s a watercolor I did this weekend to get back into practice. Damn, I’m rusty.

I signed up to participate in a zine wrangled by my friend, Tenebrous Kate. The premise is “Dream Dates with Fictional Villains.” I picked Doctor Doom. The original title was to be “Doom Does Not Engage in Foreplay,” but I also thought about “Foreplay is for the Fool, Richards!” The title is still in flux. Anyway. This is my elaborate scripting process. This is actually more than I often do when scripting comics. A lot of the time, I use stick figures. Anyway. This is pencil on a stray comic book backing board, which I find is the ideal surface for doing thumbnails for comics. (via Christianne’s Art and Comics: Dream Date With Doctor Doom WIP)

christiannescomics:

"Denial" (2010). Still clearing out old stuff before I get to the new. This was the first comic I ever drew entirely with digital tools. Adobe Illustrator.

Reblogging from my comics tumblr.

christiannescomics:

"Denial" (2010). Still clearing out old stuff before I get to the new. This was the first comic I ever drew entirely with digital tools. Adobe Illustrator.

Reblogging from my comics tumblr.

Gugu Mbatha-Raw and Sarah Gadon in Belle

Looking at Belle (2013) on my movie blog today.

I didn’t grow up reading Jane Austen. The cult of Austen has always eluded me. I’ve often been sympathetic to Mark Twain’s attitude to Austen, which he summed up as a desire to exhume her bones and brain her skull with a thighbone every time he tried to read Pride and Prejudice. In the interests of full disclosure, I admit to having had stereotypically masculine reading tastes when I was young, and I thought that Austen had very little for me. I never expected to marry or even embrace my own gender identity. I put on a good front of masculinity when I was a teen and young adult. Lately, though, I’ve been enjoying the hell out of entertainments that are deeply influenced by Austen to the point where I think I might have to revisit her. I’ve spent the last ten years reading books like Patrick O’Brian’s Aubrey-Maturin books, which are sometimes equal parts Austenian comedy of manners and C. S. Forester naval adventure and, more recently, Mary Robinette Kowal’s Glamourist books, which introduce a touch of magic to the regency romance. I hesitate to suggest that this is a gendered response. It might be. It might not be.

Here’s the thing, though: we are living in an era where diversity is becoming more and more the norm and part of that process is reevaluating the past from a post-diversity point of view. Reevaluating, I say, and reinterpreting. Adding an awareness of race and gendered oppression and intersectionality to new works derived from old ones has a tendency to engergize them. Andrea Arnold’s Wuthering Heights, to name one example, turns that story into something radical by adding color to Heathcliff (something that has some justification in the text of the novel, it should be said). Casting Djimon Honsu as Caliban and changing the gender of Prospero in The Tempest does the same thing. People who complain about this sort of thing should probably examine why it is we need new not-diverse versions of these kinds of stories when the mountain of human history is littered with non-diverse versions just for the picking? This does not subtract from them. They’re still there. No one is burning them or adding them to lists of “politically incorrect” proscribed works. Last time I checked, Sense and Sensibility was still on the shelf at my local library in its original very white, very English form. So was Conrad’s The Nigger of the Narcissus. So was Gone With the Wind. But, really, it’s time to move on.

It is an awareness of race and oppression that enlivens Amma Asante’s Belle (2013), which is otherwise a painfully straightlaced costume drama of a sort you’ve seen a hundred times before. In its particulars, this is a Jane Austen story in which two sisters—one an heiress, the other destined to be penniless unless she marries well—navigate the waters of matrimony, searching for the right match, avoiding fortune hunters when they can. The film complicates things considerably with the race of its heroine, and therein lies the film’s hook.

horaceknightely:

kefkaownsall:

Hey its a show about trans women played by a trans woman 

As well as a Kickstarter fund to get this on television, with broadcasting in both Canada and possibly the United States! It’s also produced by a queer trans independent filmmaker, Amy Fox, and has only 52 days left to raise $50,000 CAD.

Those who can support through reblogs and/or donations, please go ahead! The link above is a clickthrough straight to the Kickstarter. Backers get cool prizes like copies of the screenplay, 8 x 11” prints of the lead actress Julie Vu from her photo shoots, download links the the ENTIRE first season, and more.

(via rosalarian)

amazonchique:

Random doodle. Because I don’t want to live in a world where anteaters can’t enjoy peanut butter.

amazonchique:

Random doodle. Because I don’t want to live in a world where anteaters can’t enjoy peanut butter.

Joe Shishido in Branded to Kill

Joining in the fun on the 1967 Blogathon with a look at Seijun Suzuki’s Branded to Kill on my movie blog today.

Really, none of this matters. This isn’t a movie about plot. The plot is the same kind of stock genre drivel on which Suzuki had been laboring for a decade. It’s a plot that’s been repurposed a dozen times since Suzuki’s film came out, whether in The Wachowski’s Assassins or Johnnie To’s Fulltime Killer. What does matter is the way Suzuki films it. This is the kind of film that Godard was groping for throughout the 1960s, in which most of what is on the screen is completely arbitrary, including an utter disregard for the “rules” of narrative filmmaking. “There is no film grammar,” Suzuki has said. There are only shots and cuts. Which isn’t to say that Suzuki’s film is slapdash. In spite of Nikkatsu’s disdain for the film, there’s a firm command of formal composition in Branded to Kill. It’s just not conventional composition.

colleendoran:

Ick: someone who grouses about Kickstarter “donations” and claims a real publisher should just get a loan, because they’re professionals, right?

Well, Kickstarter isn’t a charity.

Most people use Kickstarter as a way to acquire up-front funding by returning to the customer value for their money…

colleendoran:

Every once in awhile, some disgruntled person or other goes off on a series of rants about pesky artists who, in the words of our esteemed colleague Allan Harvey, “…have the temerity to want to make money from their art.”

The rants expose artists who have donation buttons on their websites…

Colleen Doran drops the mic. Again. She’s good at it.