thebristolboard:

Original page by John Totleben from Miracleman #14, published by Eclipse Comics, April 1988.

Totleben’s work on Miracleman was breathtaking. No wonder he went blind.

thebristolboard:

Original page by John Totleben from Miracleman #14, published by Eclipse Comics, April 1988.

Totleben’s work on Miracleman was breathtaking. No wonder he went blind.

Andy Serkis in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

Looking at the well-made, but not very much fun Dawn of the Planet of the Apes on my movie blog today.

As I say, this is all very laudable, as are the overarching themes of tolerance in the face of aggression, understanding instead of prejudice, and diplomacy instead of warfare. This is a film with very humanist (simian?) values. But, man, it’s a downer. As an entertainment, this is depressing. Its fatalism in the end points to a world where apes are supreme—it has to given where the series ends up—but that supremacy is built on a foundation of human corpses. This is a film that’s drenched in melancholy. It’s a film that should be a romp, but it plods. It’s serious and grim when it should occasionally wink at the audience. It’s the grimdark fallacy brought to a franchise that has always had a satirical bent. This is the most dour film in the series, even considering that Beneath blew up the Earth and Conquest cast Caesar as Malcolm X. A scene like the one in the original film where we see the orangutans on Zaius’s kangaroo court posing as the “see no evil, here no evil, speak no evil” monkeys would utterly break this film’s game face. That might not be a bad thing. Traditionally, the apes of these movies have been chimps, gorillas, and orangutans, but the last film added bonobos to the mix and bonobos settle their disputes by having sex. I know that this film was bound by its rating, but think of the possibilities! Alas, no.

brianmichaelbendis:

Here’s a gallery of illustrations by Moebius from the Blueberry series 

(Source: thebristolboard, via pixoholic)

transcatharsis:

burdenedwithgloriousbooty:

brownwerkk:

southernish:

THE FUCK???!!!!!

LGBT folks can legally be fired in many states and you fucks want to crash a job fair specifically for LGBT people?

I know it’s hard out here to find a job but seriously……fuck you.

Good fucking bye heteros 

Is there a greater metaphor for how privilege actually operates in a real world setting than crashing an event specifically created to address the exceptional needs and challenges of a marginalized group that you don’t belong to and then complaining about how much the event focuses on those people?

I can’t even…

colleendoran:

OK, so a comics blogger informed me at a convention a few months back that they didn’t know why I got invited to so many conventions and did so many appearances, because there are more women in comics out there than me, and I was hogging all the attention. They don’t think it’s fair for me to be…

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

People will stare. Make it worth their while → Alexander McQueen | Pre-Fall ‘10-‘11

Puurrrrrrrrr

I NEED that black dress with all the belts <3

Yeah. That dress is awesome. I need it on my body, like, now.

(Also: Cosplay has invaded haute couture? Sweet!)

rosalarian:

Jackie reaches out to a touring Moira in today’s Meaty Yogurt. Read this comic from the beginning. There are 200 pages. What a milestone! Thanks for reading, everybody. If you want more frequent updates, go to my Patreon. Even $1 goes a long way!

rosalarian:

Jackie reaches out to a touring Moira in today’s Meaty YogurtRead this comic from the beginningThere are 200 pages. What a milestone! Thanks for reading, everybody. If you want more frequent updates, go to my Patreon. Even $1 goes a long way!

Osh-Tisch: Princess of Two Spirits (1854-1929)

rejectedprincesses:

image

This week we focus on Osh-Tisch, whose name translates to “Finds Them and Kills Them” in Crow. Osh-Tisch was a male-bodied person who lived as a woman, and was one of the last Crow Nation baté (Two Spirit spiritual leaders) – oh, and you can be sure, she earned her name.

She is also far from the only awesome lady in this story.

Read More

(via tonidorsay)

Morgan Freeman in Lucy (2014)

Looking at Lucy (2014) on my movie blog today.

The truth of the matter is this: I didn’t particularly want to go see Lucy (2014, directed by Luc Besson). I’m not fond of Luc Besson’s films. He’s not quite on my black list because his films usually strike me as stupid rather than malign, but his films can be so very, very profoundly stupid. More, he tends to fetishize his heroines in a way that makes me uncomfortable. But here’s the train of thought that put my butt in a theater seat on the first day it was in theaters. I’ve been bitching about the sorry lot of superhero women for a while. It galls me that a talking raccoon with a machine gun is going to get a movie before Wonder Woman. It galls me that they fobbed off the Catwoman movie on “talent” that had nothing invested in the character nor any respect for it either. It galls me that mealy-mouthed movie executives bleat prejudice as truth when they say that women can’t open a tentpole movie while counting all that money from The Hunger Games and Maleficent. It galls me that I don’t have a Black Widow movie yet. I want my damned Black Widow movie. And so: Lucy is a superhero movie of sorts starring the Black Widow her ownself, Scarlett Johannson. I better put my money where my mouth is if I want my Black Widow movie. So I ponied up to see Lucy.

A warm-up drawing. Red col-erase prismacolor on crappy sketchbook paper.

A warm-up drawing. Red col-erase prismacolor on crappy sketchbook paper.

Tags: drawings

Tilda Swinton in Snowpiercer

Looking at Snowpiercer on my movie blog today.

The setting of the film is uniquely structured for set pieces. Each train car as our heroes move forward presents a new environment with a new set of rules of engagement. In this, Snowpiercer recalls its origins as a graphic novel. You can view each new set as a panel border if you like. This is an elaboration of the scrolling corridor fight in Oldboy stretched to encompass most of the film. Certainly, the ax fight that’s the film’s most brutal and energizing set-piece seems derived from Oldboy. In spite of the film’s structure, it doesn’t seem episodic. It’s all of a piece, with each part of the film forming a tile in a mosaic whose overall picture only becomes clear in the exegesis at the end. But even if it were as episodic as it sometimes seems, the individual pieces are all so touched with strangeness that it would still be worth watching. If the structure of the film seems looted from other films, then the excressences that decorate that structure are Bong’s alone, whether it’s Mason’s appearance and her odd hand gestures (also part of the exegesis at the end), the big fish into whose guts Wilford’s thugs dip their axes at the start of the ax fight, the ghastly punishment meted out to dissidents involving the freezing wind and a big sledgehammer, the seeming clairvoyance of Namgoong’s daughter (which provides the film with one of its best shocks), Allison Pill’s homicidal teacher and her creepy pedagogy. or the sushi bar mid-train where our heroes and the film take a short rest mid-film before plunging toward the climax. All of this marks the film distinctively. There’s a whiff of steampunk in some settings, while there’s a resplendent miserablism in others. None of these settings necessarily reads as “real,” but for the most part it doesn’t matter. This is a fable more than it’s a story in the conventional Hollywood sense of the word, so the set of reality is permitted some level of abstraction.

christiannescomics:

The Courtship of Doctor Doom for Tenebrous Kate’s Dream Dates with Fictional Villains ‘zine. Mostly brush and ink on bristol board. The working title for this was: “Bah! Doom Does Not Engage in Foreplay.”

Reblogging myself again.

christiannescomics:

The Courtship of Doctor Doom for Tenebrous Kate’s Dream Dates with Fictional Villains ‘zine. Mostly brush and ink on bristol board. The working title for this was: “Bah! Doom Does Not Engage in Foreplay.”

Reblogging myself again.

"Part of being an adult is going, ‘Yes there are people prettier/smarter/more talented than me, but I’m good on my own’. You’re not oppressed by something just because it makes you feel insecure."

Molly Crabapple (via wordsaresinging)

Oh, boy, I wish I could shove this into some brains until it sticks.

(via colleendoran)

I need to shove this into my own brain until it sticks.

(via colleendoran)

beautyandterrordance:

"Sometimes I have wondered whether life wouldn’t be much more amusing if we were all devils, no nonsense about angels and being good”, via universalmonstersblog.

(Source: fred---astaire)

Not necessarily a call for submissions

I was having a conversation with another comics-drawing trans lady friend of mine a few days ago and we kinda sorta brainstormed an anthology of comics by and about trans women. There would have to be some kind of crowd-funding, of course, and I would want to see everyone get a good page rate (trans women being chronically poor). Would there be any interest in this? And who would be good candidates for inclusion?