amazonchique:

Oh man! Someone lost their skeleton down here you guys! I’m gonna check his collar.
From The Secrets of Cats is an RPG from Evil Hat

Your work is always so good. Pardon my insane envy.

amazonchique:

Oh man! Someone lost their skeleton down here you guys! I’m gonna check his collar.

From The Secrets of Cats is an RPG from Evil Hat

Your work is always so good. Pardon my insane envy.

krelllabs:

So all those trans-themed comics I’ve been doing for the last couple of years? I’m Kickstarting a small collection of them. Viva trans ladies making comics!


Well, how about that? Someone at Kickstarter chose my project for their Staff Picks! Plus, I’m going gangbusters given that I’m a totally obscure artist running her first Kickstarter. Woohoo! Thanks everyone who has reblogged or tweeted me!

jothezette:

Things I sometimes do to get over artists’ block.  Hope this helps!

(via anatomicalart)

Just a reminder

sassysyndicalist:

Liking something on social media does nothing to boost its reach.

Reblogging, commenting, or sharing does.

This PSA brought to you by the Trans Lady Bloggers Desperate For Traffic Association.

chasmofsarcasm:

how to tell if someone is really bisexual:

  • if a true bisexual utters their name backwards, it will send them back to their home dimension for a minimum of 90 days. 
  • fire type bisexuals will always be able to learn the move solarbeam, unless they are flareon. 
  • biologically, bisexuals are incapable of going down stairs.
  • some bisexuals are unable to cast a shadow, though this is currently up for debate

Bisexuals devour the heads of their opposite-sex mates after sex.

(via seananmcguire)

So all those trans-themed comics I’ve been doing for the last couple of years? I’m Kickstarting a small collection of them. Viva trans ladies making comics!


rambleonamazon:

I want to write a novel about a trans woman that uses all those tropes trans women know but cis people never hear about. Stuff like…

  • Slowly realizing you’ll have to lie to your therapist about how stereotypically girly you “need” to be, if you want them to actually move you ahead with transition.
  • The freaking food cravings from HRT.
  • The first time you get aroused while also wearing feminine clothing and have a massive identity crisis, worried that maybe you’re just a fetishist.
  • Spiro tastes like mint.
  • That time in your teenage years when your mom finds your make-up/clothes/bra and just throws it away and never speaks of it ever. Ever ever.
  • The hundredth time you have a admit that yes, you do know that you’re very tall.

I shall be lauded as a literary genius. Unless people find out I’m trans. they’ll I’ll be accused of only writing genre fiction.

If you bite it, spiro tastes considerably different from mint. I think I might be sensitive to the smell and taste, though. I have to turn the bottle away from me to even open it.

krelllabs said: Pumpkin pie or pecan pie? The season is soon upon us.

rambleonamazon:

Tough choice. I love eating both, but probably pumpkin a little more. As for cooking, my pumpkin pie wins hands-down. It is legend.

Yeah. For cooking, definitely. I usually use butternut squash instead of pumpkin (it generally tastes the same), mostly because it’s easier to seed.

katedrawscomics:

3liza:

I post something like this about once a year, because I get a lot of messages from people who enjoy my art but feel guilty about not buying things from my store or subscribing on Patreon or getting things from my wishlist, etc. You really don’t need to do ANY of…

cinemapanopticon:

The Spirit of the Beehive (1973, directed by Victor Erice)

The Spirit of the Beehive is one of my favorite films. It elides a lot of its themes because Franco was still in power when it was made, but it’s not hard to see its critique of fascism. One of the greatest evocations of childhood ever filmed. It’s the kind of film you might get if Terence Malick had made Pan’s Labyrinth.

cinemapanopticon:

Häxan (Witchcraft Throught the Ages, 1922, directed by Benjamin Christensen)

One of my favorite silent horror movies gets a still set on my movie tumblr.

cinemapanopticon:

Max Schreck in Nosferatu (1922, directed by F. W. Murnau).

I’ll probably be watching a bunch of silent horror films this October. There’s a weird kind of poetry in them that sound films never quite matched.

cinemapanopticon:

Barbara Steele in Black Sunday (1960, directed by Mario Bava).

Halloween is coming soon. That means horror movies. And my eternal love of Barbara Steele.

Man, Spider Woman is unfortunate in her interpreters

…because as bad as this ghastly Manara cover is…

…it’s not as bad as this godawful cover art from New Avengers #4. I can’t even parse this anatomy.

In Bloom

Looking at the Georgian neo-realist film, In Bloom, on my movie blog today. One of the best films I’ve seen this year.

I don’t think this is a film that could have been directed by a male filmmaker. This is clearly Nana Ekvtimishvili’s film, regardless of whether or not she has a male co-director. She wrote the film based on her own memories of growing up in Tblisi in the early 1990s and there’s a core of lived experience in the details, whether it’s the politics of navigating a breadline or the chatter among girls in bathrooms and weddings and private gatherings where there are no men. There’s a palpable sense of place in this film, too, and even a sense of geography as we watch the characters walk to their various destinations. All of this is beautifully shot with an almost clinical eye by Oleg Mutu, a ringer from the Romanian cinema. Ekvtimishvili and co-director Simon Groß are natural-born filmmakers. They have a gift for naturalism and deliberate takes and they know the value of space carefully placing the camera in space. This is one of those contemporary art films that eschews a score, but unlike some films where that choice tends to annul the pleasures provided by cinema as entertainment, in this film, that choice is matter of keeping things from boiling over. Like most melodramas, this has the potential to boil over. The directors exercise remarkable restraint. Instead, you have an implacable narrative that swells more like a tidal force than a wave, and by the end of the film, its power is undeniable. This is a beautiful and heartbreaking film.